Follow us on Instagram @actionacademypodcast
Aug. 25, 2022

How To Create An Online Business That Prints $344,000 Per Month w/ Paul Xavier

How To Create An Online Business That Prints $344,000 Per Month w/ Paul Xavier

Paul Xavier is the founder of contentcreators.com and specializes in helping creators and digital entrepreneurs monetize and build a business off of what they're passionate about!

Paul originally began as a corporate worker himself but eventually quit when a mentor of his told him he had what it took to build his own business. Fast forward years later after a lot of failure, floundering, and 200k in self education - Paul now owns a multiple 7 figure business.

Today we talk about how you can do this too!

For Frameworks, Freedom Tips, and Millionaire Financial Breakdowns -
Subscribe to our 5 Minute Weekly Newsletter (Thursday 10 AM EST)
https://brianluebben.com/newsletter

@brianluebben
@actionacademypodcast
https://brianluebben.com
https://paulxavier.com

Resources:
GoBundance
Are you an accredited investor and want to learn more about GoBundance?
www.gobundance.com

Book a call to learn more: https://calendly.com/brianluebben/gobundance

Transcript
brian:

Paul Xavier. what's been going on with you. How you.

paul:

I'm great. Yeah, I've been been busy but in a great way, I took pretty much a little more than half the month off last month, and we had a fantastic month in terms of growth and success@contentcreator.com, which is my primary business. And then we have a lot of real estate opportunities that we're investing in right now. That always gets me excited. I love that side of things. It's cool. When you can have vacations and then come home from them and things are better than when you left. And there's like these cool opportunities that you are learning as you're growing to jump into. So that just

brian:

makes me happy. That's the freaking dream. And that's what everyone works towards. How was unplugging for a little bit, because right now I'm doing that full time. Like I'm traveling as I'm doing this show and as I'm creating my content, creating my media company here, and it's very difficult because I have a lot of free time. An insane amount of free time now because I run my own schedule and I can dictate what I want. And I've got a lot automated now. And it's very difficult. Whenever you have free time as an entrepreneur to not try to fill it with something. I'm curious about what you've been doing with that.

paul:

I'm an all on or all off kind of guy. So I don't struggle too much with the all off because I'm all off in those moments. I think where a lot of people struggle is that capability to do something and then completely shut off because you're gonna have remnants of that thing that you were working on. As you're now trying to do nothing. And I think that's like the, at least from when I used to travel the world a lot in work with all my media company, that's what I noticed. And so the way that I have reshaped my life is I'd rather be all on for a day. All off for a day. And I like what I do so much that I go all on most of the time, cuz that's my passion, but same when I take two weeks off or something like that there's no phone calls. There's no emails. There's no texts on work. There's nothing.

brian:

So you cycle, so you went and traveled around the world too. And did all this.

paul:

Yeah, I did that. Maybe seven years ago. Six years.

brian:

So you just did one on one off, over and over again.

paul:

I I've learned that over the years, as far as what works best for my personality type, I'm not very good at and my wife will is a great example. Like she's the one who I think notice this more than I did, cuz sometimes you need that person knows you really well to tell you, Hey, like I think you're setting yourself up for failure here is, if I wake. I have my off moment in the morning where I'm gonna wake up, I'm gonna do my workouts. I'm gonna do my meditations. I'm going to spend time kinda like intrinsically looking at myself and enjoying that part of the day where before work takes place, and then whatever I choose to do after that, if I'm going into work, if I try to work and then get back to this point of I'm not focusing on work anymore. I'm gonna go do something else and just hang out and relax. I've I'm too far gone. Like, all I want to talk to with my wife about is work. All I want to talk about is this opportunity. All I want to like my friends that I hang out with, I want them to be work friends. Whereas if it's an all off day after those meditations and that workout and that morning routine, it's more okay, today we're going on a hike today. We're going, yeah, let's go with the flow. We're gonna play games. We're going to take the dog out. We're gonna do more things that are less work focused. And then my mind naturally subconsciously goes into different places. And so I'm more of like at peace on those days.

brian:

And then that's what allows for the higher level, like visionary work to come through. It's whenever your mind's ramped down, it's not stimula.

paul:

I think it depends like for me, I definitely do more better, like extremely better visionary and integrated related thoughts when I do my focused work that is on those topics. I don't, I'm not in the weeds busy. Some days of the week, I'll spend, at least a full day thinking about why I'm doing things the way I'm doing, why our company is structured, the way it's structured and how can I reallocate or restructure things and what can I kill to give energy to something that deserves it more than what I have been doing?

brian:

That's a super interesting quote. What do I have to kill to give energy to something else? Say more on that?

paul:

Just think about it through the lens of You only have a hundred percent of your energy, right? Sure. And if you're to start, everybody has 24 hours in the day. And if you're trying to get somewhere right now, there's infinite number of ways to design strategies, tactics, teams, businesses, to get you to that point of whether it's, financial freedom or perhaps it is working alongside for me, a lot of my biggest passions are working alongside people. I love so like deep, meaningful relationships with people. I really if I don't have that in my life, I'm completely empty. And I've noticed that as I've built businesses by myself, two businesses with my closest friends or people who become my closest friends through work. And so depending on whatever your goal is, it's really important to. Spend some time, not just in the weeds, but it's the sharpening, the saw exercise, right? Spend time focusing on why are you doing things the way that you're doing them? Should you be really executing this strategy or could there perhaps be something that will get you there faster, better, more efficiently. And if there is then kill that thing that you are doing, that's distracting you from the strategy that will get you there faster

brian:

or better. I love that. You're saying that because as I'm doing this I'm documenting everything. So I'm doing a lot of journaling as I'm traveling and I'm putting everything down and what this applies to people listening too. So this isn't just, if you're traveling around the freaking world, this is everyone's business and everyone's life because we have a work life and we have a home life and it's not really a balance. It's more of a balancing. So this is all stuff that people can apply and use in that. So let's take a segue here and talk about your background and your media company, because I know a bit about it, but I'd really like to know how you came up in this space and in this world. And then we can dive into the notes and bolts of it, because this is something that I am definitely swinging for and is super interesting.

paul:

Sure. Yeah. To go this quick version of the story from a business standpoint of my life is my first real opportunity in business was not as an entrepreneur. It was as a W2 worker for a government contracting firm, helping out behind the scenes of my best friend's father, who gave me this job working as a software engineer and a recruiter at a government contracting firm that he, we built up together over a four year period and that he sold and I got to see the. Of that business. I got to work alongside that. CEO, watch him hire, however many people. It was I think it was in the twenties or something like that, and then sell at a multiple million dollar exit point. And I was like, as a kid who comes from a, My mother is a hippie with no financial knowledge and my father is a mailman. So I, and there was, were lower middle class. Very little financial knowledge in my family whatsoever, even to my, extended family, cousins and so on. Seeing that taught me. A lot of D very important lessons, like how businesses run. And then the best thing that happened was that particular person my best friend's father told me to quit and go build my own business because he said that I'm smart enough. And if I don't, I'm probably not gonna be that passionate in my life. And that was a bigger cost to me then just, Hey, giving up the nice nine to five money. So what age was that? I was right before I turned, I wanna say 21 is that range.

brian:

And this guy is in your ear, like classic, rich dad, poor dad style saying, Hey man, you need to quit this job and you need to go do your own thing. Yep.

paul:

Yeah. So it very much was like a rich that B deck, cuz I saw my family and knew that was not what I wanted. When you know what you don't want because it's what all that, and then you get exposed to something that's an outlier there that almost doesn't seem real. It's like, why how's this possible? It made it very compelling, very drawing to be like, I'm gonna listen to this very weird advice that no one else is paying attention to and take this different route. And from there. I basically became a freelancer and most people who become freelancers fail on their face really hard over and over again. And that kind of happened to me for probably a year and a half. I just flopped around doing videos for people, shooting them as a freelancer, creating websites, running some mats for people. And I found this niche of basically creating a website doing some videos for them and then running ads for them on Facebook and YouTube that created a couple things. An upfront payment, which was great for a new client, as well as recurring monthly revenue. And when you're trying to replace an income recurring monthly revenue is huge, especially if you're a service provider, because you can make a lot of money and not necessarily have it be tied to how much time you are working, if you're leveraging technology. So for me, the technology I was leveraging to make recurring revenue was websites. Cuz you basically upkeep you change a website page here and there, but you get paid to fee whether you do anything or. Fantastic. That's the same thing. I would run Facebook and YouTube ads and you get paid a monthly subscription, even if it takes you an hour a month to run the ads, or if it takes you, 20 hours a month. So depending on the client, the amount of spend you're dealing with and how much effort you're putting into it, I was able to get this kind of Non-attached relationship between what I was selling and bringing in every month and how much time I was putting into it. And that was the first kind of like creation of time, freedom associated with money that I was dealing with. Did that for a while. Then I got into teaching. So my friends from film school, who I was hiring to shoot a lot of the videos for me, they kept asking me, how are you getting paid this? Why do you keep hiring me? What the heck is going on? Essentially cut

brian:

me in. Yeah.

paul:

well, I was already, I was paying them to do the video, but then they saw how much money I was making on the back end, like every single month from these things. And my first client as a coach was just a friend of mine in film school. He went on to be successful and then multiple other people started asking questions. That's the first thing to notice if you're trying to get into online education, which is what I do mostly now is do you have people asking you, how are you doing what you're doing? Because if you do, there's probably a demand outside of the people who already know and trust you asking those questions who want to have you package something and give it to them to streamline them, getting to that same point. So that's basically what happened there is I started teaching, got into masterminds coaching courses, and today I run a website called content creator.com. We teach people filmmaking skills. We teach people how to build businesses as content, creators and filmmakers, and We'll do you know, we're a multimillion dollar year business on that front super high profit margins. And we use that to invest in real estate and just create more leveraged income, leveraged, passive, essentially opportunities for ourselves.

brian:

And this is why you join GoBundance people. This is why you join go buns. Because for me, like I've been around for about two years, and then it's always like that one person or like the, those two people that are doing that exact thing that you want to do. And you're it, dude. That's exactly what I'm trying to do. Like to the, is be able to become an income generating machine. Through this entire ecosystem and then be able to dump all of that into cash flow and real estate, because, and I don't know if you went through this pivot, but for me, I used to be like, I've got real estate. And so I used to be like, oh, I'm a real estate investor that also does media. But then there was a pivot at some point in my identity to where I pivoted to. Okay. I'm actually like a media company that also does real. Was that a pivot for you? Or was that kind of the game plan? All.

paul:

I think that and this is something I talk with my wife about a lot, but like titles are they're helpful when you're getting started, but then they become damaging as you get like bigger constraining yeah. Constraining. And so instead of calling myself a real estate investor or a content creator I think you just have to look at what all of us are, and we are all investors, like at a higher level than anything you're investing. Where's your time. What are you doing with your time? We're all in a sense creators of our own reality. So I look at those two titles as my primary things, not content creator, not real estate investor, but more so like creator. Cause I'm creating every single day. What's gonna happen with my family. What I can create with photos. I can create with videos. I can create businesses. I can create relationships and friendships, every single one of those things. I have the ability to go create today, tomorrow in the next and in the future investing. Same thing. Like you have to invest where your time goes and you have to invest where your money goes and what those investments are. So I look at it through like those two lens are probably my two largest identities. And then you go more like from a business standpoint, you go more deeply into each one. When you are looking at a real estate asset versus an, a stock or an index fund or buying a business or so on.

brian:

Yeah. That's super interesting how you view it like that, because that you're exactly right. You hit the nail on the head is what got you. Is what got you here? Won't get you there. So while you may be able to write a label up and write a niche up, once you get to that certain point, It's gonna be, it's gonna handcuff you and it's gonna shackle you. So you need to break free from that before I wanna talk about like the actual revenue and the back end, because I know you said you're operating at like a 98% profit margin, which is freaking insane. And I know that because I see it over and over again with all these content creators and how they run their business. But first, I wanna talk about the space a little bit in general for a couple of minutes and what maybe a couple things going wrong and what people do wrong in this space, because there's a negative stigma in association with content creators and like, oh, okay bro. Cool. LOL. You've got another paid course for me. And I see that percolating through this ecosystem and like on TikTok and Twitter and everything. And you see a bunch of people that are super underqualified pumping out some dog shit course, that's just not worth it. And then that's polluting the ecosystem. So , I guess the question is , what do people do wrong and who is wrong for this space before we get into what to do? That's right. And then the business. I would

paul:

say There's a lot. There's a lot to unpack with what you just broke down. Like for a lot of people, I would say the number one fear that stops people from getting into online courses and education and masterminds and helping people in this space is the feeling of not being qualified. The feeling of being like, I don't trust myself. I don't feel like I have enough qualifications, awards, certificates, like things that I have done to put me in a place to teach. And I like to tackle that one on the head and say the opposite, like your bill Beek is one of the best coaches in the world. Do I trust him on the football field? Absolutely. Absolutely not. Am I gonna let him be a quarterback? Hell Noella check. Probably can't even throw a

brian:

football. You could throw him in there, throw him on the O line

paul:

Yeah. But that's, there's a difference between a Fano. Not necessarily all the time, but many respects, there are better coaches out there than players. And even if you don't have a tremendous amount of Awards or certificates or things like that. If you are, if you have more of a a drive within you to give. To help people to accomplish something that maybe you've accomplished or you have helped someone else accomplish. Okay. I look at both of those as a formula for success, right? Let's say you're a father and you were never in you never swam before you were not a swimmer, but then you daughter is a swimmer and you teach her and you work with her and you help her become a phenomenal swimmer. Can you take that formula and then teach it to someone else? Absolutely. And it comes down to like most importantly the areas of right in online education are the people who care about the people. And the thing that they're helping people with. If you are passionate and you have a desire to truly help you, you can do some amazing things in the space. It's the people who look at it as a fast, easy money grab and who don't truly care about the people that they're building their business to serve, which I think you. At a root, like that's a bigger problem beyond even online education. Like just in general. Yeah. In general, if you're building a business around a human being that you don't want to spend time with or surround yourself with, get out of it. Like I was listening to a book with Warren buffet and Charlie Munger the other day, where they were deciding whether they were gonna buy the company snuff, which like kills tons of people. Cause it's like a tobacco product and they decided not to because they knew it wasn't in alignment with who they were and what they wanted. That company went on to make $3 billion in profit and they sleep easy at night, knowing that they made the right decision for them not buying it. And I think that's a really important thing is like you have to first off understand who you're serving, what you're helping them with and be in alignment with that thing more than anything. If you have that online education is great for you. If you're just looking at it from a money grab perspective, that is the biggest. Internal core problem in the industry. So many people think that it is that and try to do that and fail.

brian:

I love that you say that and you're completely right. Is that same sentiment would apply in any part of business and real estate in fricking if you're doing door to door sales job, if you're not in it for the right reasons, you're gonna get expelled pretty quickly. You're gonna get, you're gonna get exposed and expelled really quickly. I think that what you said was really cool and really important for the audience. Because for me, I also thought that I was underqualified to do this podcast I'm doing today unless I had a hundred units. That was my made up arbitrary number in my mind was I was like until I have a hundred units cash flowing, I'm not qualified to be able to get on a microphone and tell people about goals, success, or achievement, because I don't have a hundred units yet. And nobody told me that. I just told me. So I'm curious, what were the limiting beliefs you had before we get into some some more like marketing work here. What were some limiting beliefs that you had at kil to be able to get off the ground? Cuz now you've got a multimillion dollar business that you're churning.

paul:

I think very similar to any, anyone, like similar to you. I had this sense that I wasn't enough, the feeling that I'm not qualified enough. I had a few personal barriers that I had to work through. Growing up, I had a list. So the letter ch you know, I had a speech impediment. I worked with a. For a very long time to correct and be able to pronounce things properly. And public speaking is always in a sense, terrified me to a degree. A lot of those things where you look at that individual and say, Hey If you were to look at me as a kid and say, oh, that person's gonna build online education business and be on a bunch of videos and build a company that way. You'd probably say, nah, not hip, yeah. Not that guy. It's probably the really extroverted kid. Who's making everybody laugh and having a great time. And that wasn't who I was, but I had some good people around me over a long period of time. And I knew that there was something calling me to do those things, even though I wa I didn't have those skills. And I think that that's the thing like any skill can be developed? Public speaking is a skill, right? Running Facebook ads is a certain level of knowledge. And then it is the skill of repetitively doing it, learning and being able to make good decisions as you're in those accounts. Building businesses is a skill at the core of it. Like it's under, it's a certain level of understanding, and then it's doing. Over and over and get becoming a better executioner on those items of running a business. And so for me, I had the right people around me who just told me, yeah, failing is growth. So enjoy it. And you'll develop the skills sooner or later to be good enough. To achieve your dream. I can't remember the quote exactly, but it's like ice melts at, I don't know, 34 degrees, 32 degrees. And when I started, I was freaking negative 10 degrees. Yeah. And some people, they start at a 40 degree Fahrenheit. And so they're already like, when I got in the industry, I watched people. Skyrocket from where I was starting, just skyrocket past me. They go to zero to a hundred thousand dollars a month in no time. And I was like, holy crap. Seeing it was cool. Cause I was like, it's possible. But I started way behind that and had to build a ton of skills just cuz of my natural aptitudes. Weren't quite there to get to the level of success that I have now. And of course am still working. That's

brian:

that's badass that you say that because Alex formo says the same thing. He said if he was making $75,000 a year right now, what would he invest in? What's his best advice for investment? He goes, I would take all that money. That's extra cash, and I would invest it into acquiring skills to buy my time and freedom back. That's exactly what you just said. And I'm buddies with Brandon Turner who runs, he was one of the largest podcast hosts in the world with bigger pockets, podcasts. And he was on this show and he had a speech impediment. He had a list and his thing that he was most self-conscious about in life with his was his freaking voice. Yeah. And so now he becomes synonymous with this real estate podcast that people know him from his voice. Yeah. So it's. It's funny how it keeps going and it keeps repeating. , your greatest weaknesses are just your strengths overused. But I think the opposite also applies to where it's whatever we're most self conscious about is normally our superpower, ironically.

paul:

Yeah. So like our greatest strengths are our weaknesses under used.

brian:

Yeah, exactly. So I want to get into the business part here in a second, but there's one more specific problem that I see over and over again. And selfishly it applies in my business as well. And it's one of the answers questions that I'm trying to answer as I travel. And it is this niche. However you wanna pronounce it. Yep. People have a generality problem. People will go and they'll have all these great ideas, but they can't figure out who specifically they're talking to and what specific problem they're helping that person solve. And people will talk at such a high level that they're not actually speaking to anybody because if you make content for everybody, you make content for nobody. What is some advice you have? On finding and defining your niche when it comes to building this online education platform or online business and whatever, have you, what's your, some of the best advice and tips that you can give people on doing that because that applies to business in general

paul:

as well. Sure. Can. Can I enjoy this one, cuz I think it's a very important question, but can I kinda I want to hear for you, especially since it sounds like this is something you are working on at this moment in time. Define how could you. Define the word niche for me. What is a.

brian:

So for me, I viewing it as I view it as a person. I view it as literally like a name person. So my whole thing, and I do a lot of like marketing training and stuff as well. That's a skillset that I'm trying to acquire is really hitting on my marketing degree. Cause I've got sales down is I'm trying to come up with that avatar, like that person that I'm speaking to in this podcast and what problems that avatar has. And. And how I can help that person get from where they are to where they're trying to go. And then be that bridge between the two problems, the problem and the solution. So for me, that's a niche at its core, is that

paul:

speaking to that person. So I in a way, like if I were to define niche, I would say that you have a, you have the right elements here, but almost the focus is. And I see this a lot in marketers, especially people who read a lot of marketing books, which I can tell you're doing just by the language that you're using. There is a when I think of a niche, I don't think people often say the person, the avatar. And when we say those things, subconsciously we jump into demographic information. It is a man. He is 20 to 30 years old. He is wearing this type of shirt. He likes to wear khakis and they make a hundred thousand dollars a year or $20,000 a year. And lo Ladi Dodi, da this demographic information. A niche is not demographics. A niche is psychographics and it is what people want. So when I describe a niche, the way that I would say it is you want to learn filmmaking in 14 days in the fastest timeframe possible for the least amount of money, having fun in the process. It is the desire. That is the niche of the people, not the person. Itself and so bomb. When you think about niches, it's not a 22 year old girl in her mom's car driving on the highway. That is the niche. It is the fact that her, she wants her car to be clean and nice when she takes it home to her mom to be like, look, I take care of this vehicle. That is the niche for a car wash. It is the desire to have that car washed. That is the niche. And. When you're analyzing a niche, it's analyzing how many people have that desire. How I don't have demographic information on almost any of my customers for the most part, cuz I don't really care about it. What I care about is understanding the desire enough to where I can communicate it to all the different types of people who share that desire. That's why when we're titling books and when we're coming up with the, like the headlines of our courses or the headlines of our advertisements in marketing, we're not saying Hey dude, in blue khaki, like we're calling out to the thing the person wants, right? Financial freedom through real estate investing. It's that's what the person wants. Exactly.

brian:

And now if you're listening to this and you run a khaki's company, I'm sorry, but this doesn't apply to you because your guy is the person that's 22 years old wearing khakis.

paul:

he might be that he might be that person, but again, the niche is not the niche is the fact that he wants khakis. Yeah. Because yeah. And then why does he want khakis? He wants khakis because they're comfortable, his wife, he wants to work for state farm. Yeah. Let's be Jake from state farm, man. Bingo. So you have to understand those whys. More than anything else. That is your niche. God, man,

brian:

that was worth its weighting gold. Thank you for that. That was when I do this podcast, it's very cool because I can. Take like little bite sized quotes that are very memorable from people and then just stick them in that memory bank. And that was one of 'em man. That was a very good quotable. I haven't heard it phrased that way before, so thank you for that. Yeah. So now let's open the hood a bit because I have a rudimentary understanding of how. The different mechanisms of an online business and medium business and how you do it. I know it's all about like lead flow coming in and then the infrastructure to support it, either that be with coaching or with mastermind. So for you, let's start with the thing that will be the same for most of it, which is lead generation. Because even if we're talking about coaching or mastermind, we're gonna be talking about leads. If you don't have lead flow. You're dead in the water. So let's go ahead and start with that and maybe give best practices that you've seen is let's start with Facebook ads. So a lot of people say this with this new algorithm shift, Facebook ads are dying or they're a fraction of the percent effective that they were before. So how are you generating lead flow? What's your take on Facebook ads right now?

paul:

You're familiar with entrepreneurs operating system EOS. Every go bro is I'm assuming.

brian:

A dabble. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. So I had 'em on my podcast

paul:

too. oh, nice. There you go. Yeah. So EOS presents this framework. I look at it through the lens of there's only so many different things that happen in a business. Every single business has these same. Fundamental core systems within it. I look at it as your leadership system is your first system. And that is you as a human being leading this company at the end of the day. If you don't have the leaders, you don't have the people in the business when you're trying to start it. That thing ain't going anywhere. And if that leader's all confused and he's jumping from thing to thing and trying all these different things. How far do you get? Not very far, cuz you're not focused. You're not giving it the time and depth that needs to succeed. Secondarily, you have value creation. So like. How are you creating value for customers? And that's in the beginning of a business, it's just a concept, right? Like a car wash is a concept before it is agreed upon built, put debt together and able to deliver value for people. So the same thing happens in online education. Once you understand that value and the who you're serving and why they want that value, then it comes down to marketing and that's where a lead flow comes in. So like first and foremost if you don't know. The niche, which is the desire for this thing, right? You don't know where you should be marketing. So Facebook, isn't the answer. YouTube, isn't the answer. Figuring out why people want, what you're trying to sell is the answer to the marketing equation. That is the first thing. So first off, know yourself, what you want to do while you're trying to do it. Secondarily, understand the value you're trying to create. That's gonna answer your marketing question. When people say Facebook ads doesn't work. That's like saying television ads don't work. And radio ads don't work. If they don't work, why the hell are people still paying for 'em it's because they do good point, but they work in skillfully executed scenarios. They don't work in unskillfully poorly executed scenarios, which is what most people. So I think that's a really important distinction. All pretty much all marketing still works. Like you can do direct mailers for real estate. Those things still are. They're on fire and it's been around for ages, right? Infomercials late at night, still work. You still see people selling cooktop. Silverware stuff on there all the time, and they're making a fortune on it. But it's understanding that value creation that you have to offer that answers that marketing question. And then once you understand who that person is, why they want your thing, where does that person hang out and how can you skillfully execute marketing in that place? So that way you get their attention and convert a percentage of those people into customers at a.

brian:

If you were to break down your lead flow, your entire lead flow practice and how you have it allocated throughout different methods and structures, what would you break it down? Is it all Facebook ads or are you running it on different? Are you doing SEO? All the different stuff. I know this is probably like a surface level question, but it's just one that I'm curious

paul:

about. So it depends on the offer that we have. So like the specific product line or offer that we have in our business. So I'll give you an example. We have, from a value creation system, we run our business is called content creator.com. We center around helping people who are content creators that want to improve something, right? The first thing content creators wanna improve is their actual skill is content creators. So they wanna learn how to shoot better. High quality professional cinematic videos. And most of them, especially these days, content creators wanna do that on their smartphone. So think about that desire, right? That desire can be ha held by an 11 year old little kid who wants to start a YouTube channel to a 65 year old man, trying to increase sales for his nice speaker company that he built. And the human being is in a sense like translucent, it can be so many different types of people demographically, but the psychographic is I want to learn this and specifically they want to learn it fast. They wanna learn it affordably. They wanna learn fun and they wanna be able to get their questions answered in a way where it's tailored to them. Like someone has done the work to make it easy for me. That's what people want when they think of that experience. So it's like the

brian:

valuable equation, Alex, for.

paul:

Yeah. And that's basically what we put together is an offer that teaches people filmmaking skills in 14 days in the most fun way possible for the most affordable price on the planet. We just built that thing. Now, when you think about that person, where are they trying to find that? Where do they hang out? That person's on YouTube, watching videos on how to shoot better videos that person's hanging out on Facebook and Instagram and TikTok and watching all these people create good content and wanting to emulate. Right that person's going on, Google and searching. How do I shoot better videos? That person is watching television in the evenings. They are listening to radio as they drive their car. And they're everywhere right now with all of those channels being possible options for me, the ones. I start with are the ones where I have a natural aptitude or a natural skill built in first for me, that natural skill was in Facebook video, Facebook, YouTube ads, TikTok, because that's the stuff I know. That's my generation. Like I grew up with the stuff it's really easy for me to use. And Facebook ads and YouTube is really easy, but that being said I'm sharing that as one example. I've got a friend who sells a workout program over the radio and makes a fortune. Who's one of our clients in one of our courses he's selling it like hot cakes over the radio. Yeah, really. And it's because he understands how to skillfully execute radio ads for. His audience and his audience is right there cuz the people who wanna get fit, right? What are they doing? Oftentimes they're driving a ton. They're back hurts. They're not feeling great, but they have these long commutes and he's tailored his marketing to, Hey, are you sitting in your car right now on another hour long drive with your back hurting. That strikes a nerve for people. Do you wanna learn how to get yeah. That's nice work period of time. Yeah, there you go. And so he understands that medium. That marketing channel enough and he knows how to skillfully execute it for his program.

brian:

The reason I'm hitting on all this is because this is something I'm actively working on. So I'm really leaning in on you on all the places that have been the most friction points for me, because from what I've seen, like I could talk to you about, okay, walk me through like the payment processing software, walk me through how you price things, how you structure the content and all of this. And maybe we can do that another day, but I'm asking you the high level stuff that people can really like. This is the stuff. That we're talking about today that if you do this work, if you're listening to this podcast and you do this work, if you're creating something online or if you're creating something in your business at all, finding your niche with the psychographics that he just talked about in the question, I'm about to ask about the offer. So the offer. Is something that I am struggling with because there's so many different directions that I want to go and I can't figure out what my grand slam offer is what Alex or mosey, obviously I'd set him multiple times. I'm digesting a hundred million dollars offers over and over again. And what you're talking about is the value equation and where it's, you want to get people, their dream outcome and the shortest amount of time possible with the highest likelihood of achievement in the in the least amount of. so that's what you're trying to do with your offer. I'm curious about the process that you went through in your offer creation, because yours is very rock solid. Like I saw your offer in your ad ironically. And I was like, that's, that is a solid fricking grand slam offer. I don't know how people could say no to that. And it's proving difficult for me. So I'm curious about that.

paul:

First off, what do the people that you're trying to serve want?

brian:

That's the question that we're still trying to.

paul:

Why don't you ask, so you have this podcast, which is your natural skill. So you're a skillfully executed podcaster. So in terms of a marketing channel, you've got that as a natural marketing channel. Let's just say you get, 5,000, 10,000 downloads a month, maybe 25,000. What do those 5, 10, 20 5,000 people. To learn, what are they try and not just learn, what are they trying to achieve in their life. And there are two categories that you can create a program or an educational product on one of those categories is skills. What skills can I teach you? What skills can I give to you that are gonna create value in your life? Secondarily is goals. What goal can I help you to get and achieve in your life? A great example of this is. We're looking at a skill of filmmaking skills, right? I will teach you to shoot cinematic videos right now that you know how to do that. You can do it over and over and over and over again right now, a goal is I'm gonna help you build your first six figure filmmaking business. Okay. Now, when I get you to a hundred thousand dollars in your filmmaking business, you've achieved that milestone, that goal. So those are the two primary areas. I focus on getting, creating, or centering a product around or packaging a product around is either helping someone develop a skill, like learning a new language becoming a better quarterback. So that way you can throw the ball, a certain distance, then you have The goals that people have in their lives. So it could be, my goal is to be happy after going through a really painful divorce, my goal is to lose 25 pounds and be able to see my abs. Again, my goal is to quit binge eating. My goal is to do all of these different things, and so first off is if you don't know what skill or goal to focus on, and you're agnostic to that ask. Just pull your community and be like, when you listen and talk to me and are enjoying this podcast. What do you really want me to dedicate a substantial portion of my time to, to create the absolute best path program possible on planet earth to get you to a goal or to teach you a skill that I. So if you ask that, there you go, people you'll, there you go. People

brian:

get some better results and we're officially asking that's a tandem ask, okay. Through the alley and I'm gonna dunk the basketball. So what do you guys wanna see? So that way I can stop staying up at night, trying to answer that myself. So there you go, everybody. Now it's a two way communication. Let me know. Anyways, man that's greatly that's that makes a lot of sense. And that's a problem I see with a lot of people's businesses is they don't have a good offer. And they don't know specifically who they're help, who they're helping and what that problem is and what they're helping them solve, because they just don't know. And these are successful businesses that could still, that they still have success, but they can't get to that next level because they don't have that specific answer. So that's why I was, that's why I was curious about that. So I appreciate that. Yeah,

paul:

no worries. And one thing that's also fun. There's a unique style. Of course, probably one of my favorites is watch me achieve this goal. Watch me develop this skill. I don't have watch me achieve this goal I haven't achieved before. Right now that in and of itself can be a course. It can be a program where you work alongside. People to achieve that goal or develop that skill that right now you don't have those are really fun. So like examples of that are, workout programs where the mentor goes through that program with you and transforms their body as your transforming yours. It is someone who is sitting down saying I'm a terrible public speaker, but who wants to join this program and become a phenomenal public speaker with me? Man, this

brian:

man's spitting. This man is spitting, dude. I love it. I love it. So the last one of the last questions, I wanna be conscious of your time here. So there are two major revenue drivers and your answer may be, it depends, which is a fine answer to give, but there are two major revenue sources and that's coaching. And then there's also mastermind like courses. So you've got coaching and you've got courses. So you have one where you're dedicating time, maybe one on one or one to many where you're doing group coaching or single coaching one on one, or you just have a static course that sits, like you said, with your websites where people go through the course and then they're able to go through modules and then have help there. From your perspective, which is a better way to start out for people that are starting into this business, which business model is the best to begin with. Should you do a hybrid of both? What do you

paul:

think? Great question. I think it it's a hard question to answer because it's a little bit, there's a lot of context that needs to be given dependent upon the individual. Like every human being has different natural aptitudes and different skills. And so they also have different personal biases related to what they're willing to do, what they want to do. And so some people, the idea of doing a DIY course where you're gonna sit down and shoot a bunch of videos, put 'em in a content portal and then people are gonna go through it automatically. And it's the coolest, most fascinating, fun thing in the world to them. And other people were like, wait, so you're telling me you're gonna remove. My ability to talk to my clients and like work with them in a small capacity. Like you just ripped out the whole reason I'm doing this. So I think that distinction right there, alludes to my answer, which is, it's a personal question that you have to answer for yourself. Look at yourself, have self awareness to know. I I want, one versus the other in that sense now, can you make. But ton of money in either of those. Yes. I also argue there's actually a third category I just really argue, there's no one to argue unless you wanna have a fight on this. Let's do it.

brian:

I can argue for, do you want me to, just to play at a devil's advocate? Yeah. I hate the internet. there we go. I think all this is stupid. TikTok is stupid.

paul:

There's three categories. What's up there that I visualize. So there's DII courses, which are fully automated people. You can sell a hundred thousand units in a day and it doesn't affect your time. You've got coaching, which is done on a one to one basis or a group basis where you have a one to many relationship. Then you have mastermind. Masterminds are a different animal. Masterminds are GoBundance right now. You and I are on this podcast because of GoBundance, but GoBundance isn't. Co abundance is a culture and a community that you buy into and the community is the value of that educational product. So those three different things in building each of them is very unique. It requires different skills, different, personal biases, different strategies, and so on to achieve success with each one. I do all three. So I have literally. A business working in every single one of those different categories that has to do with my avatar wi and my, goals and skills that I teach people, which is content creators. So again, yeah, like there's no good or bad in any of them in the sense of everyone's made up differently. You have different biology than me. So know yourself, the,

brian:

to clarify to specify, to even like niche down the question. A problem that I see in business is that people try to be a Instead of being a serial entrepreneur, they try to be a parallel entrepreneur, which is a term that I got from Jeff Hoffman. Who's on the show and he's the founder of priceline.com. He's a billion dollar guy, billionaire. And he said that people tried to do too many things at once, which leads to them being terrible at everything or lackluster at best. So when you're doing this, would you recommend doing one at a time? Because I feel like people try to build all these together and that's where they crash and

paul:

burn. Definitely do one at a time. So choose the one that again, fits with you personally, and then go all in on it and give it the time that it needs and the give it your best ability, cuz for one you should be giving everything in your life, your best ability, cuz you don't have an anymore time other than what you are given on this earth. So use it and use it as well as you can go all out, go big, fail big. It'll be way more enjoyable if you do. And but definitely do one at a time. My, I would say my superpower has been focus through everything. Like I will fail and be the most focused person at learning and developing new skills, creating new paradigms and strategies for success. And I will just keep going until it is at a point of success to where I can automate. Or outsource it to someone on my team or out like somewhere else. And as long as you get to that point where you can get things to a level of competency and. You can create a lot of freedom,

brian:

rock and roll. So let's close this out. Let's hit maybe a last little, three minute spurt about the revenue that you're producing from these courses. So people can see how important this is. And then let's do a plug for your course that you're actually running right now that you were just talking about in content creators.com. Plug that. So let's talk about the revenue and then why people should go to you to learn how to make this revenue.

paul:

Sure. Yeah. We Last month, we did $344,000 in total revenue. And in terms of. Just like the business in general businesses like this are really they have huge waves of ups and then you go back to an average and you go up and then you have an average, what matters is cuz like in courses, what you have a lot is product launches where boom, someone hits for a month and then they stop selling all together and then they come back six months later. So you'll see that I'm a huge fan. Product launches. I'm a huge fan of evergreen where you just sell something all of the time. And so my business is set up to have both of those. I'm doing both of those all of the time depending on the offer and the strategy and so on. $340,000 was a great month for us. I expect we'll do that again in October, and then we'll do it again in December. But normally we're closer to I would say a 2 25 to two 50 a month revenue rate now With that being said, that's just the course business kind of puring along as we have it. We take all that profit that we're generating from that business model and just reinvest it right into real estate at this point. So that's the cool thing about it too, is it creates a lot of cash flow as you can reinvest and there goes your taxes. Yeah, there goes all my, my high income taxes. Oops. As long as you qualify as a real estate professional now as far as. Product that we have on content creator.com. We had a ton of people asking us because we're probably one of the few people who are just like independent course graders that have cracked a like million dollars a year selling a course, not on how to build a course. Yeah, that is fair. so we, we built our business, teaching people, filmmaking skills, teaching people how to build success as a, basically a full-time filmmaker, creating monthly recurring revenue for themselves, running YouTube, Facebook ads and doing recurring subscriptions with video work for businesses. So we had nothing to do with teaching course graders whatsoever, and that's why everyone was reaching out to. How can you teach me to create a course? Cause like you guys have obviously cracked the code in these other areas. Now teaching me how to create a course. And so this was actually like our fifth course that we built. It's called 30 day course creator. And it's our process from. Designing the leadership system, the value creation system, the marketing, the sales, running the actual operations behind the scenes of your course, and then doing all the financials, which are all of the systems you need to run any business in the world, but just for courses, it's called 30 day course creator. It takes you from zero to actually pre-launching. A idea for a course in less than 30 days. And we've had amazing results with it. It's been great. We've had a lot of people come in and, pre-launch courses, teaching children different skills. We've had people pre-launch courses on, weight loss in different ways, quitting, binge eating, doing some really transformational things, which again I just like to push back on that whole, everyone teaching courses teaches you how to make a million dollars. I would say the number of people teaching business programs is quite low in our community. It's more so people teaching very valuable skills, helping people with very personable, personal problems to overcome them painful problems in their lives and achieve new levels of, financial success is also one of them, but it would be one of the lower categories in our groups. I love

brian:

it, man. That's freaking awesome. And people can go to content, creators.com to find

paul:

that yep. Just content creator.com. No S on the end and check it.

brian:

Perfect. I love it, man. And for people listening, I have been fighting for my freaking life over here. Like Paul's been looking at me like I've been doing like thumbs up and everything because I've got some Spanish speaking family. That's like over here trying to take all the chairs at my table and they've got like their kid running around and like banging his head on the side of the table while I'm doing this. So I'm walked in. I've been locked in on this. And so I just wanted to let everyone know on this podcast, like I'm committed. Okay. so if Paul's doing his video mines this podcast, so this is what we do, but man, I I appreciate it, brother. This has been nothing short of spectacular. It's been fantastic. Thank you so much for coming on and giving us advice on branding. Nicheing down, how to find our psychographic buyer. Course in content creation. It's been fantastic. It's been a masterclass, so excited to have you on let's do another one down the road and let's talk about the numbers and let's open up the hood a little bit, but it's been fantastic, man. Thank you for coming on. Let's do it.

paul:

Thanks everybody. Thanks for listening. It was a lot of fun. Appreciate

brian:

it. This has been Brian and Paul Xavier with the action academy podcast signing off.