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Sept. 1, 2022

Colombian Coffee Cashflow: Business Breakdown of Green Coffee Company w/ Adam Jason

Colombian Coffee Cashflow: Business Breakdown of Green Coffee Company w/ Adam Jason

Today we have a non-traditional episode with a company that is currently open for investment capital. We break down the business strategy and revenue models to see how a coffee company runs their business!

The Green Coffee Company is a consolidated coffee farming operation based in Medellin, Colombia. The company’s innovative business model allows complete control of the supply chain: from cultivation, through processing, to direct trade with end clients. 

The GCC’s holistic approach to the coffee sector and commitment to best environmental practices not only establishes the long-term profitability and sustainability of the business, but also improves the quality of the coffee produced on the farms.



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Transcript
brian:

All right, Adam, Jason bentos. How are you,

adam:

buddy? mu thank you, Brian. I appreciate it. And looking forward to chatting with you, we know each other through common folks and haven't got too much time together. So this is a pleasure. I appreciate it.

brian:

Yeah, I'm excited, man, because I've had you. And then the other gentleman a couple of y'all that have been partnered with this same company I've reached out and every single time that you post about it and you post about production and everything, I'm like, this is the most interesting thing I've ever seen in my life. And so I'll let you go ahead and give a 30,000 foot intro of the company that you're currently working on. And then we will do a background into how the heck you got into this and how the heck you got down to Columbia.

adam:

sure. You could see behind me the legacy group logo that is our private equity firm down here in Columbia business. Started back in 2015. I joined as a partner in 2017. Really the thesis is, and as things continue to tape, take shape more and more. We make big bets on companies that we either build from scratch or that we. Are comfortable putting a lot of our own money into that. We find down here in Columbia, south America. Where I am. The idea is really how do we open this market? New opportunities, new industries to primarily us Bo based investors, but really people all around the world who are seeing less opportunities in their home markets, whether it be public equities, real estate. Basically traditional investment products. How do we open up alternatives in industries and markets that we think are captivating, but also offer obviously the level of financial return that's necessary to get people to go from. I'm gonna put my money in a ETF that tracks the S and P 500 to I'm gonna invest in a private company based outta Columbia, because the return is so much higher and it's more exciting. And if you're with us in the coffee side, maybe you love coffee and getting some of it to your door every day and being a part of it, there is a lifestyle aspect to it as well, but we try to do exciting things. We stay pretty focused in terms of the scope and the industries that we touch, the idea is big bats, big concentrated bats, great returns, new opportunities.

brian:

I love it. So let's go ahead and shoot the elephant in the room in the forehead here. So when people think of Columbia I wouldn't say stability is a word that comes to mind as a synonym for Columbia and for the emerging markets in Latin America. Normally you see the vice versa phenomenon where you have the Columbian businessmen and the Latin American and the Brazilian all go to Miami as a hub to invest in America. So let's go ahead and talk about what opportunities are there and what to look for when investing in other markets internationally. Because a lot of people listen into this show. I want to get into the nuts of bolts of the business, cuz it's freaking awesome, but that's gonna be the first question they.

adam:

yep. The most popular question I get is what is it like in Columbia and geared towards the exact points that, that you mentioned? Is it stable? Can you actually build businesses there? I think people who have spent any time here understand the. Opportunity that awaits. You have a tremendous amount of human talent in Latin America. You have a tremendous amount of underserved people in Latin America that are basically subject to big oligopolies in traditional industries like banking. What have you, where interest rates are super high, all these different factors that make, living in the us seem very easy compared to being here at the same time, you have a relatively stable rule of law. There's opportunities here that we're seeing, that you could never pick up for the amount of capital that you would require. If you were gonna do basically a Corolla business in developed markets like the us or. Western Europe, for example, but we're conscious of it as, as we have conversations with investors. And when we look at opportunities, like I mentioned at the start, you have to find things that are big enough and promising enough for people to say, you know what? This is worth taking a chance on what do I see being on the ground here. I've been here for five years now and moved here full time in January of 2018. And. I get lots of optionality in life and could live where I want to, and I choose to be here because I like it. My wife's here built a life here. And also I see a lot of promise in, in what the opportunity and the market. and the market offers it's different, but it's different in a way that allows people who aren't from here. And those people, obviously from here that see it too. But to take, I don't know, call it the everyday experience of living in a developed market. Look at an emerging market from the outside in and say, wow, here's the efficiencies? How do we fix these? And you can create great opportunities around.

brian:

I guess you also can offer a perspective as a competitive advantage operating traditionally in our market systems to where you can apply those efficiencies and systems down there to where that would be groundbreaking. Correct.

adam:

you basically can. A lot of the, where Columbia is now from a development standpoint, I would say it's a lot of copycat businesses coming to the market that have shown proof of concept elsewhere. Instead of Amazon, they have Meto. Which is this exact same platform, there's a lot of, okay, this worked in other markets, let's bring it to Columbia and apply it to this market. But what we're seeing really now, and I would say over the last couple years and investment dollars coming into the market, prove that out is a lot of new idea. A lot of things that are focused on local problems, but at scale, we're talking about huge populations again, that are underserved in even things like buying real estate banking medical. Access all these big problems that affect a lot of people that develop market solutions don't always fit nicely into. So the amount of Mar the amount of capital that's coming into Latin America, but Columbia in particularly has been huge in recent years. I When I got here at the end of, or end start of 2018, end of 2017, we're coming out of a year in 2017, where 20 million. Venture capital money came into the country by 2019, that number was over a billion dollars. This past year, we were seeing companies hit unicorn status. So over a billion dollar valuations and people and companies getting funded by the likes of Berkshire Hathaway soft for 200, $300 million. Investment amounts. So the market's opening people are seeing a, I would say dwindling opportunity set in developed markets and looking to emerging markets, understanding that a lot of them are becoming more stable. They're offering opportunities like we've already discussed and frankly capital goes a lot farther. Now we can talk about exactly what we're doing here, but, for 35 million that. Brought to Columbia. We've become the largest coffee company in, in, in the country. If you try to become the largest producer of what's America's number one, crop, corn how much money is that going to cost and what kind of business can you build? So you have to factor all that in, I think as you look at what are the opportunities and what's a good home for a lot of the capital that's looking for one out.

brian:

Wow. . So let's talk about green coffee company, let's talk about the company. Was this a company that you were building from the ground up or is this one that you acquired ? adam: we built it from the ground up. Wow. I got involved. I got involved back in 2017. So my background, I'm an attorney by trade. I practiced for eight years in the us at two of the largest law firms, really in the world representing fortune 500 companies, investment banks. Focused on S E sec, capital markets taking companies, public raising a bunch of money, corporate governance, cetera. I had a break between one firm and moving to my next, that was in Dallas and then going down to a firm in Houston. So Columbia had an opportunity to come down to yeah. To, so Columbia of course came here for a month, came here for a month. Loved it saw awesome opportunities. Really. It was on a vacation, but also had heard great things about the country from an investment perspective. I met my now business partner, who is the founder of the, my business partner at legacy, who is the founder of the green coffee company. And he was had just basically. Come up with the thesis had done some diligence on land acquisitions that we could do down here, but was in need of capital to get the business off the ground. We started working together because of my experience in as an attorney, all, if we're gonna attract us based investors, we have to comply with us based laws, regulations, all the strategies and things that go behind it. So I started working with him from the us part. Back in 2017 and then where I was career wise, where I was Lifewise, the opportunity I saw here was all a perfect mix of, what, I'm gonna go take a chance and go down to Columbia full time in January, 2018. So I've been involved pretty much from the beginning, kudos to my partner Cole who started the business. But, we've grown up a lot since then. Yeah. So the way that you laid that out in perspective would be like somebody coming into America , and trying to take over the corn industry or the wheat industry Uhhuh. That's just traditional legacy, billions and trillions of dollars in capital would be needed to be able to take that over. So you've got two guys that go down here into Columbia, which is one of the largest exporters of coffee in the world. And then you are able to build the leading coffee company while down here since 2017.

adam:

That's the story? It's hard to believe when you say it. I appreciate the pat on the back, but yeah that's true. It's the third largest coffee producing country in the world. About 10% of all the coffee that comes from Columbia. Or excuse me, 10% of all of the world's coffee comes from Columbia and we're at a point now we're always bouncing ideas around of kind of what statistics we can hit, but we're really expecting with where the business is going and the growth that we're seeing that in 2026, which is our target year for both the exit for our investors and really being a top scale, we think we can be responsible. All the coffee consumed globally. On one day of the 365 calendar day, year would come from our operations, which sounds small, but it's a ton of coffee. If you think that 2 billion cups are consumed every day. So is it exciting? Big goal for us and something that could be a nice one to talk about and feel proud of.

brian:

Yeah, absolutely. So walk me through the beginning thesis of this business about what was your original idea to make this different from these other companies that were already well established doing this in Columbia? How did you differentiate and how did you emerge into this market that was already pretty saturated, and then we'll get into where you are today.

adam:

Sure I would be lying if I told you that every step of the, every step of growth was perfectly planned out from the start. Really? I wouldn't believe you thesis. Yeah. There we go. Yeah. Yeah. The initial thesis was. We had a group of, we had a group of investors who were comfortable investing in commercial real estate, Airbnb type properties down here in Columbia, and wanted some diversification into agriculture. They liked the collateralized assets, hard asset type investment. I wanted something a little bit different. We had met some other guys down here, also us guys who were trying to build that product for an investor base. They, I think had some hiccups and struggled through some of the challenges that the market poses. And we were able to use them a little bit as a as a lesson. And also, I think, honestly, our backgrounds were just more suited for it. My, my partner Cole, who I mentioned. Close to a decade at PWC in, in mergers and acquisitions all, all over the world from Bermuda to Hong Kong, et cetera. We just had a little bit more, I would say financial knowhow and a little bit more of an AC access to capital for getting things done here. But the idea was create a product that serves as that alternative to commercial real estate for investors and really. It, we expected it to be a lot smaller than it has become, frankly, what we saw as we got going was, and you get to learn the industry more and how it's set up Columbia and coffee has suffered for really, I would say 40, 40 years of under investment. It's a hugely fragmented market where you have about 95% of all the. Farmers owning about three acres or less. So it's, there's no scalability. There's no economies of scale. There's a lack of investment in infrastructure. Basically the way that Columbian coffee is run is you have the Columbian coffee Federation, which is basically the union, which serves as essentially the buyer for all of the coffee of the small farmers. And then they export it to. various parties. So if people know like Juan Valdez, that is the brand of the Columbian coffee union that they put on the coffee that they're buying from. A lot of the small farmers. We also saw some larger players in the market, but mostly large land holding families that. Had the assets in their family for generations. It was never something that was gonna be an international business model. It was really okay. Grandpa put together 500 acres. I'm gonna add on another 300, we get to a thousand. We have a nice business that supports our family. And we have a good piece of real estate that we can, unfortunately, people get over their heads, but borrow against and do some other things to grow their wealth. What we saw as we were participating in the market was a lot of generational hand down of coffee assets. And by the time you get a couple generations down, down the chain, a lot of the, a lot of the. Folks who take over these farms don't really want to be in, in the coffee business. They want to go to Miami and study. They want to go to Paris wherever, but a lot of the family wealth in these coffee families is tied up in the land that they have and the coffee that they have. So to be able to get any kind of liquidity, they need somebody to buy these farms and free them up again. There's not a lot of capital coming in. There's not a lot. Of access to local money for these smaller farmers. So it really takes outside investment, but with that outside investment paying in cash, being the only buyer for a lot of these assets, we've been able to put together a lot of. Put a put together a lot of land. As we're talking. Now we have another, we have about 5,000 acres in management, 7 million coffee trees just yesterday. We picked up another farm. That'll add about a hundred acres and we've gone from hunting and searching opportunities in the market to really being sought at sought after as a buyer, because there's really nobody else that is. That is participating and efficiently participating. There's a lot of promises or somebody wants to trade you three goats and a motorcycle for your land. I We're talking about it. It sounds crazy, but it's really how it works, but it also serves for us as a. Competitive advantage. One of the biggest questions I get is why doesn't Starbucks just go there and put a hundred million dollars in and crush you guys. Starbucks doesn't have the time energy. I would say potentially not the know how of going around and consolidating and consolidating land infrastructure in a way that would make a lot of sense for them. Are able to do it because we're on the ground. We have a team dedicated to it. We're filling a void in the market. We're also creating something that for a Starbucks or a Nestle guys that we know, it could be an interesting business for them to buy in the future, which could be great for our investors.

brian:

So talk me through the business model of coffee, because I'm unfamiliar with any of this and. Believe that many people listening to this will be familiar with the actual business runnings in the profit models of a coffee company or any kind of food production facilities whatsoever. Cuz a lot of people listening to this are real estate investors, stock market equities, stuff like that. So I'm insanely curious about all of this. This is so interesting

adam:

to me. Sure. There's a lot of ways obviously to kind. Find money within the coffee chain. You can run retail stores like a Starbucks. You can sell in, in, you can sell your coffee in grocery stores. What have you, but fundamentally we're focused on our kind of three pillars around revenue generation. The first is. Farming. We try to basically control our own production. We do a lot of buying from other farmers in the area around us that we plug into our own production, but we really wanna be able to have that farm direct promise to date. What we focused on in the business is what's called green coffee sales. Green coffee is like the pre roasted. Coffee beans. So if you take off, like what would be like similar to like the peanut shell of a coffee be you get like a greenish hue that is that coffee is traditionally sold in tractor trailer size containers. You sell it to large exporters, large importers, and then they offload it to a Starbucks or a Nestle. And then those guys roast it. Turns into that dark color being that everybody's used to , that's really a com commodity play Columbia. We get about a 90% increase to whatever commodity markets are doing, but it's basically. Unlimited liquidity as much as you have, you can sell, but you're subject to the fluctuating commodity prices within coffee, but you can move a lot. You can do a lot of volume. The next pillar that we're focused on is going further down the value chain and selling roasted coffee. So right now we're designing our facility. That'll be in the us here in the near term with a goal of doing about 40 million pounds of roasted coffee. In 2026 roasted coffee is gonna be basically the whole bean or milled coffee that you would buy in a grocery store that you get in a hotel. The benefit is that coffee sells for a much higher profit margin than the green coffee. To make the math easy. Our cost of production on a pound of green coffee would be a little bit over a dollar. And right now the prices are essentially at all time highs, but let's say we're selling it for about two 50 to $3 a pound. If you're doing roasted coffee, your cost of production goes up because you're adding steps to it. You're adding transportation because of the import export, et cetera. Our cost is about $2 and there, if we're stupid, we're selling it for between six to $8. So you can see the jump in, in profitability on the roasted channel. The other one that we're really excited about and that nobody at scale globally has really ever focused on. when you pick coffee from a tree, only about 20% of it is the actual coffee bean. So it looks like it's similar to Chi cherries, like the fruit that we're used to eating. So you have the pit and then you have all the other stuff. You have the water, you have the skin you have. The mucilage you have the sugars, all these things, the history of coffee in the industry, unfortunately, is to take all of that waste or garbage and dump it in the river. Some people use it for fertilizer, but really there's been no commercial application of any. Real benefit ever in the history of the industry, we have already ordered the equipment we need to take all of that waste product, which right now, for us, not only is waste, but also a negative in terms of from a financial perspective, because we have to dispose of it. Order the, all the equipment to be able to distill that waste into. Into pure ethanol. So we have distillery equipment coming from Europe. All these tests have already been done by German research institutes. We're working with Los ands, which is the top university here in Columbia to make sure we get our formula. Correct. But to give you a kind of a sense of the scale, the equipment that we ordered, we're planning when we're running at full capacity to be doing about 12,000. Leaders of pure ethanol a day from the facility. What does that translate? Yeah, it's crazy. The amount of byproduct is just insane for every pound of coffee. You have another four pounds of byproduct. So that 12,000. Those that 12,000 liters of pure ethanol, we're gonna be making our own vodkas different kinds of gins spirits. All of that is gonna be basically our circular economy byproducts business, where we're entering more of that B2C market. And really it has potential to be higher and more profitable for the business than even the coffee industry that 12,000 leaders. Ethanol will translate into about 42,000 bottles of vodka, your 40, 40 proof vodka, I guess it would be 80 proof, 40% alcohol on a daily basis. So if we're moving that kind of, of, yeah, it's crazy. It's crazy. But nobody's looked at this and honestly, nobody's done it because of this deconsolidation. Yeah. If you could the challenge that you have. The cherries begin to rot basically immediately when you take them off of the pit or the grain, however you wanna phrase. . So for somebody who has three acres, they're not gonna have time to buy enough products from all the farmers around them and add it to their production and then invest in this equipment and then create a product. Because by the time they get it, all, everything will be rotten by having our own production and then pulling in production from other farmers. We control all that cherry immediately. So the second it's. Taken away from the coffee goes one direction. The cherry goes another. And then the cherry starts going into the distillation process to create that ethanol. So we wanna use every single thing that comes off of our trees. We wanna generate revenue from. And

brian:

Nobody knows about this. Nobody else is even. Yeah. I was about to say so nobody, do they even know about this capability or are they just do not? They just do not possess the equipment and the automations to be able to do it at scale and have the speed to do it. Like you just said set.

adam:

No, nobody's doing it at scale. There's some people who have tried to find applications for the. For the it's called Kota, but it's really the skin and pulp. Some people have made it into have dried it and then created a powder so that it can function. As you could use it as a tea. If you're drying the, if you're drying the pulp, it can also be used if you grind it into a powder, like as an alternative to baking flour some other applications, it has super high. If you look at the research studies that we've gotten back from. Universities were working with super high in antioxidants. So some people are including it in skin care, creeps and other things like that. When I talk about that 12,000, 12,000 liters of ethanol, that's only from one of our. Facilities, we have another one that we're not even using for the ethanol that we're planning to use for these other applications. So things like the skincare lines or including the kata ground into nutrition bars we're looking, the one we really want to touch on is how much of the natural caffeine from coffee can we preserve so that you're making things like seltzers, et cetera, alternatives, where we have naturally occurring. healthy ingredients that can serve as substitutes for sugars and all kind of the fake stuff that gets put into a lot of the stuff that we consume. But the thesis is, and what's fundamental is for us, this is all garbage. So as soon as we turn it into money we're really doing a lot better. So it's exciting.

brian:

Green coffee company. Come roast. Yeah, come roast garbage with

adam:

us. Basically, oh,

brian:

godly. This is insane. So I know that there's a lot of guys that are invested in this. Talk a little bit about your investor friendly package. So for people you're about to go into your next series of funding. So talk about that process and what you are offering to investors,

adam:

Sure we're launching our series C funding round, which I think is really the call it the last big growth round we need to do before we're in a position in a scale sufficient enough to get to the exit that we want, basically, in terms of exit we're targeting a. Sale of the business or an IPO in the us in 2026. So we're doing 25 million of equity we're tacking on debt to that raise. Basically right now we have no debt, Columbia functions in this, unlike the us, you basically have to build the assets and then you can borrow against them. So we have to make that equity investment first, through, through GoBundance and guys that we know we have about 75. In investors from that group with us, myself, my business partner, we've put in about 2.4 million of our own money. Everybody in our family, friends group, people we've known our whole lives are invested. Everybody's excited about the upside of the opportunity. We think in that IPO or sales scenario, we've told every. We're targeting eight X return on investment for people coming into this next funding round. I think it's frankly being conservative, but I'd rather under promise and over deliver the numbers sound big, but that's really what it looks like when you start talking about all these different verticals and how we can basically continue to utilize the base coffee production for all these additional revenue sources. Along with all of the amazing things. I think that we're doing from a sustainability standpoint, that only adds to the story being number one in Columbia and really targeting that number one. ACA coffee producer position globally is something we're starting to think about and go after. So any accredited investors, coffee industry participants who are interested in participating will have that round open again, here in the next few days, probably by the time this podcast is released a hundred thousand dollars minimum invest. That's coming my question unlimited in terms of where you guys wanna go. And everything's super easy. It's all structured out of the us. We built the business with a us headquarters, so that it's easier for the sale, easier for the IPO. So from a tax perspective, it's the same capital gains, dividend treatment that you would get if you were invested in apple, for example. So for us folks, it. It's super easy. So we'd love to have more and more guys. I think we've had, from GoBundance about seven or eight guys, all come down here and every single one of them has invested some of them multiple times. Now, one of the guys, Dustin Baldwin actually started working with us because he liked it. Yeah. He's the one that reached out. So we've got a great, yeah. So we've got a great, I think we're doing something really special. We'd love to have more and more. Guys come along for the ride. And I think that financial return of, call it eight times. Your money in four years is enough for people to get past any maybe uncertainty around Columbia or the first question you asked. I think we can, I think we can really do it. And so

brian:

for people that are looking into this where do they find you? Where do they go? That are interested?

adam:

Yep for the go bonus guys who are listening, you could find me through the Facebook group for anybody who's, outside of that you can find me by email Adam DOJ, legacy hyphen group.co and then you can go to legacy-group.co as well and find us there. That'll link you through to our investor relations page and, we can connect with. Anybody that way as well. Perfect.

brian:

So one last question and I promise we won't end on a negative note, but I wanna poke as many holes in this as I can for people that are listening, because please, now this is insanely interesting. So what threats are you looking at? What. Like competitive wise, there's gotta be other people that are at least trying to poke holes in what you guys are doing. So what are the major threats that you're already proactively looking to overcome as you're growing this

adam:

up from a risk factor perspective? Anytime you're dealing in agriculture, it's always weather. We made a conscious decision. So just to be clear, I, myself, my business partner Cole, we have two of the three seats on the board of directors. We basically are the investor facing people for the business, but we have a, on the ground management team, specialized in coffee and agriculture in Columbia with. Cumulative is probably 75 years of experience from an executive team standpoint. So in our CEO, Boris Wilner is half Columbian, half German, about 25 years in Columbia here really focused on flowers, which is probably the biggest agricultural industry here. About 70% of all the flowers in the us come from Columbia. So it's incredibly sophisticated. Logistics are way more advanced than you'd find in coffee because of the. Lifespan of flowers versus, coffee, you and I wouldn't know the difference, honestly, if coffee was on the shelf for six months or a year, but we all know if flowers are dead, that's pretty easy to detect. So yeah, we've brought in guys with that kind of experience. Our head of agronomy was the head of agronomy for Starbucks here in Columbia. Before joining us, we wanna make sure that the fundamental issues, the challenge. Harvesting crops in any agriculture industry are dealt with to the best extent we possibly can. Obviously we can't control all the rain and everything that comes, but from the technological aspects that we're putting into the farms information and data gathering around when's the right time to harvest all these different things to, to optimize our production. Those guys are incredibly skilled and doing a great job and finding more and more. Acquisitions. And we need those Colombian facing folks to, to be able to manage and operate the the business. So the biggest risk factor, we try to mitigate as much as possible on the weather side of things. Competitively. I think we want from a, there, you can look at it from an investment standpoint. There's just no other opportunity. If you wanna invest in the number one. Coffee company in a meaningful market. The only markets bigger than us in Columbia are Brazil and Vietnam, and you could never invest as a us person into the companies that control those markets. I think even Vietnam is illegal to invest outside capital there. The competitive standpoint from the business side of things, we have the benefit of being in an industry where basically, if you have coffee, you can sell it. If the price is right, we can always sell it for green. We sell coffee here in Columbia, and it's a three day turnaround cycle. There's a floor and it's basically. Price for coffee set by the coffee union that I mentioned to you before. And then you can increase the value that you can receive by quality and by different certifications, like rainforest Alliance, cafe practices, everything. So we've gotten to the highest possible threshold in the country in terms of. What we can sell our coffee for. So there's always a liquid market for that. As we move into roasted coffee, we move in more and more into the byproducts, the vodka business that I talked about, that's opening up new customer channels. Sure. We need to focus on that more and in the years ahead, if we're our risk is we produce something for $2 and we can't sell it for. Enough money to cover what the cost is. But if the way things kind of work in the roasted coffee market is if you're selling for $6 a pound there, and you have a good coffee, you can sell basically an unlimited amount because the demand on a worldwide basis is almost unlimited. If we're talking about 2 billion cups, A day and the coffee quality is incredibly high. As we enter the liquor market there's challenges, there that'll be a little bit more of a, B to C in having the right distribution relationships. , that competing with us there is gonna require somebody who has the same amount of supply, because it's not like. Whiskey or vodka, for example, that's traditionally made from corn or potatoes. Most of the whiskey that people buy is produced by one or two groups. And then they just sell the product and people put it in their own bottles and label it however they want. Yeah. They want label. There's nothing like that. There's nothing like that in coffee. So if somebody says, you know what, I wanna start a coffee vodka brand. That's great, but where are you gonna get your supply from? Who's gonna manage it for you. Who's gonna be able to process those cherries in the first six hours that they're picked from the tree. It's gonna be very difficult to find that. There's gonna be competitors, of course, but our idea is get out ahead of front of things and really put our foot on the gas and move forward in, in a meaningful way and all the verticals that are important to us, knowing that we have that downside of, in a worst case scenario, we just sell tons of coffee here in, in Columbia and keep buying farms. But I see our business way more as a acquisition target than somebody that. Anybody with real meaningful capital or any big industry participant, like the names that you would know is gonna try and recreate versus just buy it's just too much. Too much work. I could be proven wrong, but I doubt five years here. I know that. I know what it takes. yeah.

brian:

Oh my God. So for everybody listening, so this is gonna be for my accredited investors. Eight X is the expected minimum return here by 2026. Correct. So that's our window. So I will post in the show description where you guys can go for people that are not accredited, these are the opportunities that come up whenever you get to that level. So accreditation for people that may be unfamiliar is gonna be $200,000 back to back income in a year or a net worth of a million dollars. Excluding your personal residence. As we finish this show, I have to put a disclaimer that I am not a financial advisor. I'm just a really cool dude. Super cool guy. he talks in a microphone a hundred percent, so a hundred percent. So I I will give you guys that if you go and invest your money, you can do it however you want. But this has been a very cool opportunity for me to be able to dive into your business, man. This has been so cool, cuz I've been watching you guys from a distance for about a year now and it's been very interesting to me to be able to watch the whole inner workings and see Dustin go down to Columbia and come back and post the entire. Process and the entire like production process is very interesting. And then the returns of course are interesting as well. So if you are accredited, you know where to go to reach out to Adam here and to his team. And so brother, I appreciate it. What am I not asking you? Is there anything that I haven't asked you that I should.

adam:

Maybe it's a conversation for another day, we're doing a lot with, in other industries here in Columbia. I'm talking to you from, I think the leading kind of VFX production company down here lots of opportunities. It's an exciting market. People ask, should I come and visit a hundred percent? Yes. And I would love to, to welcome more people. Would you show you the show, you the market you have to. I'm grateful to you for the opportunity and getting this out in front of a lot of people. And I hope to keep telling the story so that the market here continues to improve my life continues to improve selfishly yeah. By having more and more interesting opportunities and capital coming here. So it's all exciting. It's all exciting stuff and I'm grateful to you. Appreciate

brian:

it, man. Thank you for coming on. Thanks for letting us take a look under the hood.

adam:

Absolutely. Thank you, Brian. Appreciate the time.

brian:

Appreciate it, man. All right, so everyone, you know where to go. And with that, this has been us with the action academy podcast signing off.